A Moorland Stream, South Yorkshire

Elizabeth Styring Nutt
(1870-1946) British
Title A Moorland Stream, South Yorkshire
Category Recently Sold
Medium & Size Oil on canvas: Frame: 35x40inc. Signed &dated 1932. Titled on old exhibition labels verso.
Price Band £10,000 - £20,000
Location Petworth
Biography

Exhibited: Royal Canadian Academy, National gallery of Ottawa, Montreal Art Society, Nova Scotia Society of Artists.

Elizabeth Styring Nutt studied at the Sheffield School of Art, in Italy (Under Prof. Eimi of Florence) and at Newlyn with Stanhope Forbes.

In 1919 Nutt, then an art teacher emigrated to Canada, where together with fellow Sheffield born artists, Arthur Lismer and Frederick Varley, she exerted significant influence on the development of 20th. century Canadian art .Nutt was a formidable personality who ruled the Victorian School of Art, which under her principlship became the Nova Scotia School of Art with a ‘rod of iron’ for 20 years. Although Nutt attended the Sheffield School of art with Lismer and Varley, who later became founders of the Group of Seven, she was not herself to become affiliated with any formal grouping of Canadian artists, and she maintained strong connections to English academic traditions.

Elizabeth Styring Nutt painted ‘en plein air’ and rarely referred to preliminary sketches. She used a Square –Brush technique of her own design to lay down undiluted colours on canvas, with a broad un-tapered brush.Nutt’s work shows a strong Newlyn influence, very much in the manner of an early Stanhope Forbes. Whilst at the Nova Scotia School of Art Nutt wrote leading books on the teaching of art- ‘Significance’, 1916 and ‘The World of Appearance’, 1935.

Elizabeth Styring Nutt exhibited at the highest academies in England and Canada, but remains a very rare artist at auction. Nuts’ work is held in the National Gallery of Ottawa, Nova Scotia Museum of Art, and several leading Canadian institutions. ‘Where Sunshine Falls’ is listed in Bernard Dolmans Dictionary of Contemporary British Artists, 1929, as a ‘Principle work’ by Nutt.

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